Interpretation Series

The Interpretation Series

Available as:

  • A full series for £45. Includes bonus Q&A discussion.
  • Individual speaker videos for £15 each.

 

These four training videos capture all the key learning points from our conference, Perspectives on Interpretation, with Dr Maggie Turp, Dr Aaron Balick and Patrick Casement on the value and use of interpretation and other interventions in therapy.

In this one-day conference our speakers address the question ‘What makes a good intervention in therapy?’. These three thinkers from integrative and psychodynamic approaches will discuss answers to this question including consideration of the role of ‘the interpretation’.

The art of interpretation is considered a cornerstone of psychoanalytic psychotherapy and counselling. By means of ‘the interpretation’ the therapist will observe and comment on actions and motivations just outside the awareness of their client. As an intervention it can offer a new angle that somehow feels right-enough, or can be experienced as clumsy, uncaring, and critical by clients.

These training videos will help you to explore and question the best use of interpretation and other interventions within a therapy context. The fourth and final video brings all three speakers together for a Question and Answer session with our live audience. 

The Interpretation Series in full with bonus Q&A

This is the entire Interpretation Series, featuring all 3 speakers and their presentations. This includes the bonus material of a half-hour Q&A session following the speakers and their individual talks.

This package includes:

  • Dr Maggie Turp - The chilli in the curry? Finding a balance between transference interpretation and narrative repair in psychodynamic psychotherapy
  • Dr Aaron Balick - Using the Relationship in Therapy: What makes a relationship with “me” so special?
  • Patrick Casement - Why do we interpret?
  • Bonus Q&A discussion


 

Dr Maggie Turp - The chilli in the curry? Finding a balance between transference interpretation and narrative repair in psychodynamic psychotherapy

In some schools of psychoanalytic thought – most notably but by no means exclusively the Kleinian school – the transference interpretation is regarded as the single mutative factor in the therapeutic encounter. Following on from this, interventions revolve exclusively around the transference/countertransference dynamic. Other potentially therapeutic interventions are dismissed as irrelevant, since they are not considered capable of bringing about deep and lasting psychological change.

At the same time research using the Adult Attachment Interview has repeatedly shown that a coherent and emotionally informed self-narrative, or set of self-narratives, is at the very heart of mental wellbeing. Such findings suggest that ‘narrative repair’ (Turp 2012), whereby the patient is encouraged to elaborate his or her self-stories, both with regard to the level of detail and the extent to which they are emotionally informed, is likely to be at least as important a part of the work as interpretation.

Maggie will describe in her presentation how she attempts to blend these two vital elements in her practice. Drawing on clinical examples, she will outline the factors that influence her choice of intervention with a particular patient at a particular moment in time.


 

Dr Aaron Balick - Using the Relationship in Therapy: What makes a relationship with “me” so special?

We’ve all heard that it’s the quality of the relationship that is the most important thing in therapy – but what does that really mean? After all, every single one of us will have a different character style, and this style is based on our own personal attachment patterns, our unique psychodynamics, and our individual personalities. So if all our therapist-client relationships are different, what can we say about “the relationship” that makes any sense? Furthermore, the origin of any intervention, be it an interpretation or something different, will also emerge out of the unique relational matrix between therapist and patient.

In this paper, Dr. Balick seeks to understand the very nature of an interpretation as something unique to any given therapeutic dyad at any given time. For example, the way Aaron is in any particular therapeutic relationship will create an entirely different therapy than if it were carried out by anybody else. So what can we say about the relationship that makes any sense to help us learn what makes an intervention create positive movement, fall flat, or even cause potential harm?

Drawing on clinical experience and relational theory, Dr. Balick will engage with this question by frankly describing how encountering his own fallibility in relation to his clinical work enabled a moment of meeting that sheds light on the broader question, “What makes a relationship with me so special?”.


 

Patrick Casement - Why do we interpret?

Patrick Casement is a retired analytic psychotherapist, psychoanalyst and training analyst with the British Psychoanalytical Society. He is the author of a number of seminal texts that have become required reading on many counselling and psychotherapy training courses. His first book On Learning from the Patient (1985) was an international best seller and introduced the concept of the ‘internal supervisor.

In his presentation Patrick will try to answer a number of questions about the craft of interpretation, such as: Who benefits? Whose mind is being expressed? Are we making connections or finding connections? How much is useful to say in an interpretation? What follows from an interpretation? and What is a patient responding to?


 

About the speakers

Dr Maggie Turp

Dr Maggie Turp is a psychodynamic psychotherapist and supervisor in private practice and a chartered psychologist. Her academic career has included lectureships at the University of Reading and at Birkbeck College, London. Since retiring from mainstream academic life, she has been a visiting lecturer at the Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust.

Maggie is a member of the Editorial Boards of the journals Psychodynamic Practice and Infant Observation. Her publications include several journal papers and two books: Psychosomatic Health: the body and the word (2001 Palgrave) and Hidden Self-Harm: narratives from psychotherapy (2003 Jessica Kingsley).

Dr Aaron Balick

Aaron Balick, PhD, is a psychotherapist, supervisor, and cultural theorist specialising in the understanding of modernity through depth psychology.

Aaron is an honorary senior lecturer at the Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies at the University of Essex and a founding and executive member of The Relational School, UK. In addition to his academic and clinical work, Aaron is a media spokesperson for the UKCP, a contributor and consultant to the media, a blogger, mental health writer, and a regular voice promoting mental health for children and young people on BBC television and radio.

Aaron is the author of two books, The Psychodynamics of Social Networking: connected up instantaneous culture and the self (2014, Karnac) and the children’s book Keep your Cool: how to deal with life’s worries and stress (2013, Hachette).

Patrick Casement

Patrick Casement is a retired analytic psychotherapist, psychoanalyst and training analyst with the British Psychoanalytical Society.

He is the author of a number of seminal texts that have become required reading on many counselling and psychotherapy training courses. His first book On Learning from the Patient (1985) was an international best seller and introduced the concept of the ‘internal supervisor. A later book Learning from Our Mistakes (2002), was awarded a Gradiva Award in America for its contribution to psychoanalysis.

His last book, written in retirement, Learning from Life: becoming a psychoanalyst (2006) is partly autobiographical and addresses the connections between personal and life experience and the calling of a clinical career.